Text Messaging on the Rise with Young People

20 07 2006

According to Associated Press, (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060719/ap_on_hi_te/snail_e_mail):

Email is so last millenium. Young people see it as a good way to reach an elder — a parent, teacher or a boss — or to receive an attached file. But increasingly, the former darling of high-tech communication is losing favor to instant and text messaging, and to the chatter generated on blogs and social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace.

With email becoming increasingly susceptible to spam and junk mail, inboxes can be a pain to wade through. The article continues:

Beyond that, e-mail has become most associated with school and work.

“It used to be just fun,” says Danah Boyd, a doctoral candidate who studies social media at the University of California, Berkeley. “Now it’s about parents and authority.”

It means that many people often don’t respond to e-mails unless they have to.

This trend towards instant messaging, like SMS and MMS, means that mobile phones will become increasingly preferred as a communications platform, and educators will need to adapt to this preference. While the article makes the following prediction in the context of work, the word “companies” could just as easily be replaced by “educational institutions”:

“Like parents, they try to control their children,” [a senior design anthropologist at Microsoft] says. “But companies really need to respond to the way people work and communicate.”

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30 08 2006
Mobile Learning » The Future of M-Learning

[…] The Age reported in 2005 that 8 million phones were sold in Australia in 2004, and that the vast majority of mobile phones sold are equipped with built-in cameras.  That’s close to one new mobile phone sold in 2004 for every two people in Australia.  It adds that 13.7 million MMS messages were sent in the 12 months leading up to July 2004 – the figure two years later would be considerably higher, as analysis of the Net Gen demographic points to instant messaging (such as SMS and MMS) becoming their preferred option for communication, validating IDC Market research cited in this paper on mobile learning in higher education (citing Chaisatien, W. (2004). Australian cellular 2004–2008 forecast and analysis: Upwardly mobile. IDC Market Analysis, #AU202116L, Vol. 1.).All of these indicators point to camera phones, and MMS, being readily available for the majority of TAFE students within a relatively short period of time – particularly among younger attendees.  I believe that there is far better penetration of mobile technologies amongst students than among teachers – if educators want to capitalise on the tools available to students, we’ll need to savvy up quickly! […]

30 08 2006
Mobile Learning » The Future of M-Learning

[…] The Age reported in 2005 that 8 million phones were sold in Australia in 2004, and that the vast majority of mobile phones sold are equipped with built-in cameras. That’s close to one new mobile phone sold in 2004 for every two people in Australia. It adds that 13.7 million MMS messages were sent in the 12 months leading up to July 2004 – the figure two years later would be considerably higher, as analysis of the Net Gen demographic points to instant messaging (such as SMS and MMS) becoming their preferred option for communication, validating IDC Market research cited in this paper on mobile learning in higher education (citing Chaisatien, W. (2004). Australian cellular 2004–2008 forecast and analysis: Upwardly mobile. IDC Market Analysis, #AU202116L, Vol. 1.). […]




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